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Ligne Bretagne Pipe #1820lb

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 Price:$SOLD
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It's been too long since I did a green pipe. It works great here because this is one of the natural horn stems that's an utter PITA to color match with... It's all smoky creams and greys and charcoal grain swirls and about he only pipe finishes it goes well with are solid black or bleached white pipes. I didn't want to do either here but I thought, "I bet that would look nice set against a deep emerald green" and voila, the pipe you see above. Rather than arguing with some variant shade of brown, the grey tones of the stem work well to make the green bowl look even more striking. And striking it is - Really nice blast on this one, with stacked age rings from top to bottom running in neat circles around the bowl. I already loved this bowl design anyway, it's sort of a reverse Prince with the weight of the bowl moved upwards instead of settled low around the base, and the shape works ideally with the grain here to allow the age rings to "expand" as they rise up the bowl.

The stem is another French-handcut piece with a thinner bit than most of our horn stems thanks to a deeper V slot design that's a little smaller top to bottom and more open at the sides. It still passes a cleaner easily and will likely be more comfortable for those folks who might ordinarily prefer a vulcanite stem over horn due to horn's normal thickness. The long stem aesthetic coupled with the curled, chubby bowl make it a ridiculously friendly looking thing, I'm very fond of it. The bowl rim is sanded smooth and polished to show off a bit of bird's-eye around the chamber.